The coronavirus pandemic has caused an unprecedented level of disruption to this year's MotoGP World Championship season.

The resulting financial consequences have also forced much of the paddock into 'survival mode' until racing can restart.

But is it just a short-term shock, after which MotoGP can return to 'normality', or will there be a lasting impact well beyond 2020?

"I think we should try to pack all the negatives into this year and work on delivering the short compromise calendar," KTM motorsport director Pit Beirer told Crash.net.

"Then, although we are going to have a very difficult year this year, I still hope for the scenario where the medical treatment and vaccine makes a good step forward and we can have almost a normal year next year."

Nonetheless, the German doesn't underestimate the seriousness of the present situation, describing it as a 'critical' moment for professional sport and fears some grand prix teams won't be able to weather the storm.

"I'm pretty sure everyone will struggle with budgets and I'm not sure if every team will still be in the paddock next year, especially in the smaller classes because it's just very difficult to keep all the sponsorship alive," Beirer said.

"Companies that are struggling with their own business will have a hard time to provide sponsorship and this year we still didn't race yet, so there is no sponsor income for many teams at the moment.

"So it's a very, very difficult moment for the whole motorsport family. I would say that for all professional sport around the world it’s a very critical moment."

But Beirer remains adamant MotoGP could yet bounce back with a 'normal' calendar in 2021 and, aside from trimming back on some luxuries, is confident the sport will not be permanently scarred by the coronavirus.

"I think you need to now be smart, logical, reduce unnecessary costs and keep budgets together to come back to a normal scenario next year, with a normal calendar," he said.

"And then I see this [coronavirus pandemic] in the mid-term just as a dent in the whole development, but it will not change us radically.

"It will remind us that without some luxury things, also in racing and development, you can still live and make good racing.

"So I think maybe some unnecessary things will stay away for the future. But as soon as we are back on the racetrack, fighting for that number one position, we're going to go back to that full development and full racing spirit again.

"I think racing people are very strong-minded to get over this [crisis] really quickly."

MotoGP is hoping to hold around 12-14 races this season, aided by the use of back-to-back events on what could be an all-European calendar, held behind closed doors.

An unofficial deadline of mid-December has been set for the addition of any flyaway rounds, to avoid carrying over too many scheduling difficulties into 2021.

Latest 2020 MotoGP Calendar

Round

Date

Race

Circuit

 

8 March

Qatar (MotoGP cancelled)

Losail

 

17 May

France (postponed)

Le Mans

 

31 May

Italy (postponed)

Mugello

 

7 June

Catalunya (postponed)

Barcelona

 

21 June

Germany (cancelled)

Sachsenring

 

28 June

The Netherlands (cancelled)

TT Circuit Assen

 

12 July

Finland (cancelled)

KymiRing

 

30 August

Great Britain (cancelled)

Silverstone

 

25 October

Australia (cancelled)

Phillip Island

 

18 October

Japan (cancelled)

Motegi

1

19 July

Spain (proposed)

Jerez (rescheduled)

2

26 July

Andalusia (proposed)

Jerez

3

9 August

Czech Republic

Brno

4

16 August

Austria

Red Bull Ring

5

13 September

San Marino

Misano

6

27 September

Aragon

Aragon (rescheduled)

7

4 October

Thailand

Buriram (rescheduled)

8

1 November

Malaysia

Sepang

9

15 November

Americas

COTA (rescheduled)

10

22 November

Argentina

Termas de Rio Hondo (rescheduled)

11

29 November

Valencia

Ricardo Tormo (rescheduled)

 

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